North Skelton Miners Payslip

Theres lots of information held within this payslip that Gavin Brett shared, theres quite a bit thats difficult to read so I will add to this over time.

Dorman Long and Co. North Skelton Mines, 9th November 1935.
The payslip is for two people, G Thornton and  (J Barnet ?) suggesting they were working as a team, probably one breaking the rock and one filling the tubs.
Their token number is 163, this would allow the weighman to record the stone extracted by them at surface.
received_955300857933597

They only worked 1.5 days and extracted over 29 tons of ironstone and a small amount of sulphur (this sits in a thin band at the top of the ironstone)

Theres a small amount paid for a consideration I can’t read.

The district percentage might apply if a certain area was more difficult to work than other parts of the mine.

8% piecework award, not sure yet.

Yards I suspect would be for driving passages through unproductive ground.
received_955300887933594
They are paying for their own blasting powder, its not provided.

The checkweightmans fund it most likely to pay for an impartial individual to confirm that the mine owners internal weighman is not underpaying the miners.

Northumberland and Durham Miners Permanent Relief Fund Friendly Society – Established in 1862, following the Hartley Pit Disaster, for provision of relief to miners and their families in case of fatal accidents or permanent disablement. The fund was wound up in 1995.

received_955300851266931

The amount earned is equivalent to about £90 today, so not much for 1.5 days work by two people

Mining Geology Of The North York Moors – Friday 3rd February

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Mining Geology Of The North York Moors By Dr Steve Liverast
Local Jurassic rocks include Ironstone, Coal, Cement, Jet, Building Stone and Alum
Find out about the formation and resulting mining of these ores
Friday 3rd February at 7pm
St. Matthew’s Church, Grosmont
Donation of £3 includes refreshments

We are very fortunate to have a superb sequence of rocks across the North York Moors. They helped pioneering geologists define the early framework of the science and continue to be used to train the next generations. However the rocks have also been exploited throughout human history to build prosperity and develop the region. The Jurassic section spans some 50 million years of deposit and contains a large variety of ore minerals including ironstone, coal, cement, jet, building stone and alum. Each ore required unique environmental conditions for its formation and the talk will outline what these were and illustrate the resulting mining activity used in extraction.

The photo shows Cleveland Ironstone seams and infilled mine adits near Staithes

Saltersgate Inn – The fire that never goes out

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The Saltersgill Inn was said to contains a peat fire that had never gone out since the 1730s. The folklore tale is that smugglers hid the body of a murdered Customs and Excise Man under the hearth and he would never be found as long as the fire was kept burning.
Saltersgate Inn
The inn dates to 1648 but sadly has been closed since 2007 and is now in a poor state (not sure if anyones checked for the body under the hearth yet either)

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Handale Abbey / Scaw the Serpent Slayer

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Handale was site of Cistercian nunnery founded in 1133 and dissolved in 1539. In the 1750s the site was used as a Cotton Mill.
Handale Abbey Walled Garden, Liverton / Loftus
None of the original priory buildings remain today but the stone has been reused in the current farm buildings and walled garden.
Handale Abbey Walled Garden, Liverton / Loftus
A Medieval cross base and tomb lid are located just outside the walled garden.
Handale Abbey Walled Garden, Liverton / Loftus

Sixteen skeletons, a stone coffin and a sword were found on the site in 1830. Local legends speak of a serpent (or a dragon) that would devour the beautiful maidens of Loftus, until a brave Knight called Scaw killed it and rescued Emma Beckwith

The stone coffin supposedly carried the words “Snake Slayer” with Scaw inside still holding his sword, but the stone coffin on-site doesn’t seem to carry such an inscription and the present location of the sword appears to have been lost.

An unusual memorial on the site was erected to the last carthorse on the farm, before diesel tractors took over
Handale Abbey Walled Garden, Liverton / Loftus

The walled garden has been restored with funding from the National Park and LEADER
Handale Abbey Walled Garden, Liverton / Loftus

George Hanson Memorial, Staithes

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This clock and barometer in Staithes commemorate a local tragedy. George Hanson the Runswick Lifeboat Head Launcher died after saving a school boy and attempting to save a man in the harbour at Staithes.
George Hanson Memorial, Staithes
The plaque reads :-
Erected to honour the memory of George Hanson, A Staithes fisherman who lost his life in a gallant attempt to rescue a drowning bather in a rough sea on Wednesday 28th August 1957.
George Hanson Memorial, Staithes

Unveiled by Sir William Worlsey (4th Baronet of Hovingham and amateur first-class cricketer.) and dedicated by the Bishop of Whitby in 1959 (which would have been Philip Wheeldon at the time)

Frank Wild Statue, Antarctic Explorer, Skelton

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Commander John Robert Francis “Frank” Wild CBE RNVR FRGS was born in Skelton in 1873.

Quoting Wikipedia :-

Frank Wild took part in the following Antarctic expeditions:

In 1901 he was a member of Robert Falcon Scott’s crew as an Able seaman on the Discovery, along with Ernest Shackleton who was then a sub-lieutenant.
He was with Shackleton on the Nimrod Expedition 1908–1909 and was a member of the team that crossed the Ross Barrier and Beardmore Glacier at a record latitude of 88º23’S.
In 1911 he joined Douglas Mawson’s Aurora expedition and was in charge of the western base on the Shackleton Ice Shelf.
He served as Shackleton’s second-in-command on Shackleton’s Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914–1916).
He was second-in-command of the Shackleton–Rowett Expedition (1921–22).

Frank Wild was also awarded the ‘Polar Medal with Four Clasps’

On 29 September 2016 this statue by sculptor William Harling was unveiled in the Ringrose Orchard by Mr Anthony Wharton.

Frank Wild Statue, Skelton

Blackstone No.1 Digger, Port Mulgrave

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Buried in the undergrowth at the side of Cleveland Way near the cliff top at Port Mulgrave are the rusting remains of a Blackstone No.1 Digger
Blackstone No.1 Digger, Port Mulgrave
Blackstone & Co were based in Stamford, Lincolnshire, United Kingdom. This piece of farm machinery was a potato spinner and probably dates from the 1930s as Lister took over Blackstone & Co in 1937 to form Lister Blackstone.
Blackstone No.1 Digger, Port Mulgrave
Here is an intact model.
Blackstone Digger potato spinner at Woolpit 2009

1949 Industrial Adverts, Middlesbrough / Darlington

First batch that I posted on Facebook this week, thought it a good idea to post them here too as not everyone uses Facebook and if it didn’t just happen you’ll never find it.

Gjers Mills & Co, Ayresome Ironworks, Middlesbrough
Gjers Mills & Co, Ayresome Ironworks 1949

Darlington Railway Plant & Foundry, Bank Top
Darlington Railway Plant & Foundary 1949

Davy and United, Roll Foundry, Billingham
Davy and United, Roll Foundry, Billingham / Middlesbrough 1949

River Tees Conservancy Commissioners
River Tees Conservancy Comission 1949