Cold Moor Ironstone Trial Drift

The dirft is easy to located due to the large amount of spoil spilling down the hillside of Cold Moor.

Cold Moor Ironstone Drift Entrance Cold Moor Ironstone Drift Entrance

The drift entrance gives excellent views back towards Cringle Moor

Cold Moor Ironstone Drift Entrance Cringle Moore view from Cold Moor Ironstone Drift Entrance

The drift as a whole is fairly dry with only a small amount of standing water at the end, there are a few sizeable boulders that have fallen from the roof.

Cold Moor Ironstone Trial Drift Cold Moor Ironstone Trial Drift

Towards the rear the drift ends with a rock face rather than a collapse

Cold Moor Ironstone Trial Drift End of Cold Moor Ironstone Trial Drift

Looking back towards daylight.

Cold Moor Ironstone Trial Drift

Remains of burnt Jet shale, Cold Moor, Cringle Moor

Between Cold Moor and Cringle Moor is a large bright red scar on a field.

Alum Shale Roasting Clamp Alum Shale Roasting Clamp

On closer inspection it appears to be a large amount of burnt shale, very different in colour to the dozens of shale tips in the area.

Roasted Alum Shale

Back in 2008 I originally thought this could be the remains of an Alum Clamp which was an early stage in the Alum making process,  or that it may just have caught fire naturally

In 2013 I came across a book which describes jet shale being burnt at Cringle Moor to provide material for road making.

About 50m up the slope there is a recent collapse in the ground which has since been covered. This was a collapse into jet workings associated with the burnt tips.

Recent collapse near Alum Shale Roasting Clamp Recent collapse near Alum Shale Roasting Clamp

Snotterdale Jet Mine

Very easy to locate due to the small waterfall just to the north of the only path in the area.

Nearest to the path is a sizeable chamber thats big enough to crawl around inside.

Snotterdale Mine Snotterdale Mine

Theres a lot of what i’m assuming to be jet in the walls of this area.

Snotterdale Mine

Slightly further towards the waterfall is another open area that would require crawling on the stomach, again vein of jet are visible on the sides. The second shot is HDR to try and bring out some details.
Snotterdale Mine  Snotterdale Mine HDR

After a third hole which is only big enough to stick your head in, theres the largest open area behind the waterfall

Snotterdale Mine entrance behind waterfall  Snotterdale Mine

Its extremely muddy inside but almost high enough to stand in places, there an area which goes off to the left.
Snotterdale Mine  Snotterdale Mine

Snotterdale Mine

With a second area going deeper and to the right, again lots of jet in the walls.
Snotterdale Mine  Jet in Snotterdale Mine Snotterdale Mine

A good amount of light comes in from outside although due to flat torch batteries (doh) we had to return to the entrance rather than going deeper.
Snotterdale Mine Entrance

Ironstone Drift, Coombs Wood near Beckhole

The drift entrance in clearly visible from the course of an old tramway which runs back towards the other remains at West Beck.
Ironstone Drift entrance in Combs Wood, Beck HoleIronstone Drift in Combs Wood, Beck Hole

There are few inches of water in the bottom of drift, but it can easily be explored.

Ironstone Drift in Combs Wood, Beck Hole Ironstone Drift in Combs Wood, Beck Hole

After roughly 20m the drift ends at a clean rockface rather than at any sort of collapse, suggesting this was just a trial drift.

End of Ironstone Drift in Combs Wood, Beck Hole

Sil Howe Whinstone Mine, Goathland

A drift runs 1770 feet from moorland to the south of the Whinstone Dyke.

Entrance to Sil Howe mine Entrance to Sil Howe mine

The remains of a mine building stand adjacent to the entrance.

Buildings at Sil Howe mine Buildings at Sil Howe mine

The drift entrance is dated 1940 whereas the mine building is 1899, this is most likely due to the large bomb crater next to them both which most likely destroyed the original drift entrance.

Bomb crater at Sil Howe mine

If not blocked, the drift would lead to the base of the mine working within the Whinstone Dyke, left was “Tinkers End” and right was “Sillars” both approximately 150 feet below the surface of the quarry.Quarry in Whinstone Ridge near Sil Howe Quarry in Whinstone Ridge near Sil Howe

This mine was actually accessible until the 1980s, and also subject to a rejected application for receational purposes in the 1970s. Internal photos can be seen on Mine Explorer