Scugdale Calcining Kilns, Swainby

Calcining is the process of roasting iron ore making it more suitable from blast furnaces, these structures are similar to the larger and more obvious kilns in Rosedale.

The location can easily be approached through the woods to the North West along the old railway line which goes directly to the kilns. A large shale tip can be seen through the trees just before arriving.

A groove can be seen in the North West end, presumably it once housed a chute of some kind to load into waggons on the railway below.
Scugdale Calcining Kilns Scugdale Calcining Kilns Scugdale Calcining Kilns

The South East end also has brickwork standing approximately 10m high.
Scugdale Calcining Kilns Scugdale Calcining Kilns Scugdale Calcining Kilns

The back wall of the kilns are the majority of the remains, as the front wall and any dividers have collapsed into a large spread of rubble in front, some of the retaining fittings are still visible in this rubble.
Scugdale Calcining Kilns Scugdale Calcining Kilns Scugdale Calcining Kilns

Layers of firebricks burnt red by extreme heat and it places completely burnt away, can still be seen in position along the back wall.

Scugdale Calcining Kilns Scugdale Calcining Kilns Scugdale Calcining Kilns Scugdale Calcining Kilns

The structure was surveyed in much more detail by John Owen and published in Cleveland Industrial Archaeologist No. 22.

Osmotherley ROC Post

The ROC post is situated at the top of Ruebury Hill

Osmotherley ROC Post Osmotherley ROC Post Osmotherley ROC Post

The hatch is not locked and the ladder still in place, i didn’t venture inside today but you can see pictures of that here

Osmotherley ROC Post 

There are the remains of an aircraft post right next to the bunker.

Osmotherley ROC Aircraft Post 

Update May 2008 – Interior photos.

Sump pump and switches

Inside Osmotherley ROC Post Inside Osmotherley ROC Post Inside Osmotherley ROC Post

Vintage newspaper and targets on bedframe

Inside Osmotherley ROC Post Inside Osmotherley ROC Post

Original batteries (no mains) and chemical toilet

Inside Osmotherley ROC Post Inside Osmotherley ROC Post

Chapel Wood, Jet Mines near Ingleby Arncliffe

An entrance to extensive jet workings opened beside the footpath during forestry work in 2002 and was subsequently explored by the Moldywarps Speleo Group and Scarborough Cave Club. Nearly 1000m of passages were discovered, their investigation and mapping being covered in much details in Cleveland Industrial Archeology No. 30.
The entrance is now gated and locked, although looking down into an adjacent small collapse gives a good idea of the narrow and fragile passages through the shale.

Chapel Wood Jet Workings Chapel Wood Jet Workings Chapel Wood Jet Workings

The area of surrounding woodland is littered with collapses relating to the workings, some of the larger ones very dangerous due to ground cover, depth and collapsing sides.
Chapel Wood Jet Workings Chapel Wood Jet Workings

In fields to the south west, three parallel collapses are visible and a large shale tip still scars the hillside. These show up particularly well if you click the “Show On Map” link at the top of this post.
Chapel Wood Jet Workings Chapel Wood Jet Workings

Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

Warren Moor has the only standing chimney of any ironstone mine in the area, dating from the 1860s
Warren Moor Ironstone Mine Warren Moor Ironstone Mine Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

A completely flooded 220ft downcast shaft can be seen from the path.

Warren Moor Ironstone Mine  Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

Between the two shafts are the foundations of a winding engine.

Warren Moor Ironstone Mine Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

A vaulted roof leads from the foundations of a pumping house to the upcast shaft.

Warren Moor Ironstone Mine Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

Warren Moor Ironstone Mine Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

The upcast shaft is estimated to be 150ft deep, not reaching the Main Seam ironstone and not connected to the downcast hence the differing water levels in each.

Warren Moor Ironstone Mine Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

A number of surface drifts can be seen on the hillside to the north east which worked the Top Seam.

Gaytress Quarry Cementstone Mine

As with the nearby cementstone mine at Kettleness, these are also positioned at the top of a quarry just below the sandstone cap, making for a pretty tricky scramble.

Gaytress Quarry Cement Mine Gaytress Quarry Cement Mine 

Three adjacent entrances can be found, all appear to have suffered collapses from the loose shale roof so exploration isn’t the best idea.

The leftmost tunnel slopes steeply downwards, i’m unsure if they were built dug this way or whether its just successive heaped up roof collapses leading down to the level of the original drift.

Gaytress Quarry Cement Mine Gaytress Quarry Cement Mine Gaytress Quarry Cement Mine

Access to the central tunnel is tighter, although a similar flat area at the bottom of the slope could be seen when I stuck the camera over the top.

 Gaytress Quarry Cement Mine  Gaytress Quarry Cement Mine

 The rightmost entrance has totally collapsed and only a small gap is left.

Gaytress Quarry Cement Mine 

Another entrance is visible high on a ledge to the north, but access to that looks to be virtually impossible without climbing gear.

Kettleness Alum Works

Alum production occurred at Kettleness from 1727 until 1871. This has radically altered the appearance of the area.

The original Alum house at beach level was destroyed by a huge landslide in 1829, what now appear to be cliffs are the face of the quarry where the sandstone over the shale has been removed.

The remains of the second alum house are on a flat area on the west side of the works, foundations remain and jet mines can be found under the platform which holds the building. The whole area is covered is loose blown shale where little grows.
Kettleness Alum Works  Kettleness Alum Works

The foundations of another building can be seen on the eastern edge of the site.

Kettleness Alum Works Kettleness Alum Works

To the south of the building are a number of steeping pits which are slowly being lost over the cliff edge.

Kettleness Alum Works Kettleness Alum Works Kettleness Alum Works

The remains of stone conduits used to transport liquids are also visible in the south east.
Kettleness Alum Works

To the north of the steeping pits is the top of a cistern, again collapsing over the cliff edge.

Kettleness Alum Works

There are a huge number of features around the site although they are often difficult to interpret due to being buried by the constantly shifting shale, they are however extensively covered in English Heritage survey AI/24/2003

Tunnel or Cistern at Kettleness Alum Works

This structure was unearthed by the York University Cave and Pothole Club back in 2006. They called it a mine and while there are jet mines below the Alum House, this is at a much higher level.

Kettleness Alum Works Tunnel / CisternKettleness Alum Works Tunnel / CisternKettleness Alum Works Tunnel / Cistern

To me the construction looks more like some sort of storage tank and it appears to end with a wall rather than a collapse. Also the suspended wooden planks which would allow access above the liquid below.