North Skelton Ironstone Mine

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North Skelton mine hold a number of records. It was the last ironstone mine in Cleveland to close, having operated from the early 1870s until the 17th January 1964. It was the deepest mine in Cleveland with a 770ft shaft. It was the last in Cleveland to use a regularly use a steam winder, right up until 1951 (although Lingdale did keep one in working order as a backup until closure in 1962)
Little remains today as the site is within the current premises of Tees Components who very kindly allowed our small group to photograph the remaining buildings.

The winding house with its 1871 date stone and small door in the wall for winding ropes is the most substantial original structure.
North Skelton Ironstone Mine North Skelton Ironstone Mine
North Skelton Ironstone Mine North Skelton Ironstone Mine

North Skelton Ironstone Mine North Skelton Ironstone Mine

Other original buildings remain, although they have been modified for other uses.
North Skelton Ironstone Mine

Outside the site is a small headframe, although the real thing was very different as can be seen against the winding house
North Skelton Ironstone Mine Monument  key29x.jpg

14 thoughts on “North Skelton Ironstone Mine

  1. If I am not mistaken, key personnel from North Skelton ironstone mine were lucky enough to have streets named after them in the locality, which still stand today.

    • My husband’s great great grandfather Addison Langhorne Steavenson was chief engineer for Bell Bros and managed Skelton mine in it’s early years. There is a street in Carlin How named after him.

  2. In addition to the above I think someone called Richards used to be the original manager, with Williams as his under-manager(?), who were also immortalised this way.

    I wonder how many Bolckow Streets there are in the area? I know of at least 3……

    • My great uncle was the mine cobbler and lived and worked in William St. The walls of his shop at the front was covered in cages in which he bred canaries for the mine

  3. The siting of this mine also explains the naming of North Skelton. The casual observer would question why ‘North Skelton’ is so named when it actually lies to the south east of Skelton!

  4. Edward Williams was the managing director of Messrs. Bolckow, Vaughan & Co. and retired about 1875 whilst North Skelton mine and village were being developed. He was succeeded by Arthur Richards so both these men were remembered by street names which in more recent times have become shortened by removal of the ‘S’ and so become first names misleading people as to their origin.
    Development of the Skelton Royalty began in 1865 by the driving of a water level near Marske Mill intended to drain the future mine. This became known as North Skelton and after a few years when the true nature of the ironstone seam became known a sinking was commenced much further to the south. The name became transferred to the new site and North Skelton as we know it was born.

  5. Hello,

    I am told my great uncle William Garbutt (Jr) was killed in an accident in the North Skelton mine .. he was born in 1885 and was still alive in 1911 so it would have been some time after then .. are there any records available for research .. his father also William was a deputy at the same mine also.

    any help would be appreciated.
    Tony

  6. For a detailed view of the mine layout and workings, check out the ‘plans of abandonment’ for all Cleveland Ironstone mines. These are held at Teesside Archives and can be viewed by appointment.

  7. My great great Grandfather Thomas Ingledew was killed in November 1872 in a mining accident, I believe at Skelton mine.
    How can I find out more about this?
    Regards,
    Jo

  8. My Great grandfather was Weighman here in 1881 census his name James Fowler Suggett he also lived in Bolkow st with his family . nice to see this site .

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