John Walkers Grave, Norton

The inventor of the friction match in around 1827, died 1 May 1859 and was buried here.
John Walkers Grave, Norton
This is actually a replacement headstone from July 1972 and it says the original is in the Preston Park museum
John Walkers Grave, Norton
However the heavily weathered stone next to it also mentions John Walker which seems a bit too co-incidental, although its too worn to make out any dates.
John Walkers Grave, Norton

175 years since death of Redcar Lifeboatman

William Guy is the only Redcar Lifeboatman ever to lose his life on a rescue callout.
William Guy, St Peter Redcar
He died on Christmas Day 1836 after being lost overboard from the Zetland lifeboat while trying to save the crew of the Danish ship Caroline.

The Caroline’s crew were also lost and Guys body was not found until 17 days later, near Staithes. (although All of Her Past Glories by David Phillipson says 6 weeks)

A plaque was unveiled in May 2011 in St Peter Church and a new grave marker laid in the cemetery.
William Guy, St Peter Redcar

Yarm / Egglescliffe Pillbox

The pillbox is located on some wasteland overlooking the river crossing.
Yarm, Pillbox
Yarm, Pillbox
Its a little grotty inside as I imagine its been a teenage drinking den for years.
Yarm, Pillbox

Theres an interesting comment on the Picture Stockton website by Martin Jones who states :-
My Grandfather Oswald Bell used to help man the pillbox as part of the 19th Stockton Battalion Home Guard, they kept their ammo in one of the Vinegar Brewery room

Ingleby Arncliffe Water Tower

This decorative tower was designed by Walter Brierley Ingleby Arncliffe Water Tower
The inscription records the fact that Sir Hugh Bell built the tower in 1915 to supply water to Arncliffe and Rounton. The Bell family being heavily involved in iron and steel making in Teesside.
Ingleby Arncliffe Water Tower

In front the doorway are some colored stones which spell out “H&FB 1915” which are the initials of Sir Hugh Bell and his wife FlorenceIngleby Arncliffe Water Tower

Foxton Bridge Pillbox

Another link in the Northern Command: 59 Div. Reserve Stop Line, the same as the example posted yesterday.
Foxton Bridge Pillbox
Foxton Bridge Pillbox
Another Type-23 pillbox with an entrance in the top, i’m no military tactician but the view it commands over the river crossing speaks for itself.
Foxton Bridge Pillbox
Inside is partially filled with soil that has fallen in from above, but its otherwise in good condition.
Foxton Bridge Pillbox

Pillbox, Ingleby Barwick

Despite being only a few hundred meters from the edge of a huge housing estate, this pillbox that formed part of the Northern Command: 59 Div. Reserve Stop Line is in excellent vandal-free condition.
Ingleby Barwick Pillbox
Ingleby Barwick Pillbox
The pillbox is of a Type-23 design with an entrance in the roof and still has its pillar for mounting a light anti-aircraft defence: a Bren or Lewis gun.
Ingleby Barwick Pillbox
The gun shelf is still intact inside
Ingleby Barwick Pillbox

The Defence of Britain website gives the following detailed information :-

“From Malton N 59 Div. established a divisional reserve line. The position ran from Malton up to Hovingham, Oswaldkirk and Helmsley, where the planned line of defences was broken. The line resumed at Carlton in Cleveland, before continuing N to Hutton Rudby, then along the River Leven to its junction with the Tees. The Tees was followed as far Stockton, from where the line followed a railway route as far as the N divisional boundary.”

Slip Inn Bank

Slip Inn Bank was an accident black-spot on Ladgate Lane that was removed when the road was redirected, an 18th century bridge over Marton West Beck still stands on the now dead-end road.
Slip Inn Bank, Bridge

The vanished ‘Slip Inn’ pub (demolished 1963) is shown in this Evening Gazette article.
I’ve also found a couple of references to it being unlicensed and an Irishman was kicked to death in a brawl on the bridge.