Skinningrove Methodist Chapel

The Methodist chapel in Skinningrove dates from 1873 and is still active today.

Skinningrove Chapel
Skinningrove Chapel

Northern Echo – Wednesday 30 July 1873

PRIMITIVE, METHODIST CHAPEL AT SKINNINGROVE. FOUNDATION STONE LAYING. The ceremony of laying the foundation of a new Primitive Methodist Chapel at Skinningrove took place on Monday. For many years the Primitive Methodists conducted services alone in Skinningrove. When there were little more than a dozen houses they held cottage meetings, and it has had a place on the circuit plan for thirty years. When, through the enterprising firm of the Messrs. Pease, the population had increased to near 1,500, it was felt that this long toil should not be thrown away, but that there should be a fresh effort to meet the spiritual requirements of the population, and a site was generously granted by the late Earl of Zetland, The day being fine, there was a large gathering, and a procession, composed chiefly of working men, sang through the streets. The Rev. W. BAITEY, superintendent, began the service by giving out a hymn. The Rev.J. Wilson, Congregational minister, offered prayer. The Rev. J. G. Binney, from the Theological Institute, recently appointed as second minister, read suitable portions of scripture. The Rev. W. BAITEY, addressing Mr. W. Cockburn, who had kindly consented to lay the stone, remarked that it gave them all pleasure to see Mr. Cockburn in their midst, with his excellent lady, and likewise Mr. Francis. Mr. Cockburn had been permitted, through the providence of God, to aid in laying the foundation of a thriving industry in many village, and memorials of his devising mind would be found when he was gone. Today, he came to aid in laying the foundation of another house of prayer. Mr. Baitey then handed to Mr. Cockburn a bottle to enclose in the stone, and a silver trowel and mallet. The bottle contained a copy of the Primitive Methodist paper the Northern Echo of that day; the .British Workman, having a, portrait of Gurney Pease, Esq.; lines written by Mr. Horsley on the death of Charles Pease, Esq., a Circuit Plan, the names of the Trustees, and Members in Society, letters of Mir. Cockburn and Mr. Francis expressing their readiness to assist in the undertaking, and which, if ever exhumed, which they might be after cenrturies have gone by, all show how worthily the early managers of the firm represented the well. known spirit and principles of the masters. There was also a short record of those who took part in the services, and gratitude expressed to Mr. D. Trotter and Mr. D. Maclean, agents of the Earl of Zetland, for their kind assistance.

Mr Cockburn next deposited upon the stone a cheque for 10 shillings. Mr. J. Tyerman, a working man, and one whose devoutness is known in all the villages round about, laid on the stone the handsome donation of 5 shillings. Numerous other donations were laid on the stone, from two pounds to the child’s sixpence, making a total of over 38 shillings. Nearly 300 sat down to tea in the old School-room. The evening meeting was presided over by Mr. W. Cockburn, who spoke of our intellectual, social, moral, and spiritual duties. Other gentlemen and ministers also addressed the meeting. The total proceeds of the day amounted to about 60 shillings. The building is a Gothic structure. The architect is T. Southron, of South Shields.

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