Gisburne Bible

The Gisburne Bible was donated to Gisborough Priory in 1333 after a fire in 1289 had destroyed many of their books. It stayed there until the Dissolution of the Monasteries around 1540.

It subsequently passed through many hands before going to St John’s College Cambridge in 1635, where it has been kept ever since.

It can be viewed in Guisborough Library between September 26 and October 29 as part of the 900th Anniversary of Guisborough Priory events being organised by https://gisboroughprioryproject.org.uk

Oak Road Mosaic, Guisborough

An oak tree once stood in this place on Oak Road in Guisborough.

The mosaic was funded by the Youth Opportunity Fund and created by Glynis Johnson and local children.

Oak Road Mosaic, Guisborough

It was unveiled in 2008 but has unfortunately become damaged in the 11 years since then, I’ve been unable to find a good image of it new but it can be seen in 2009 on Google Maps in much better shape.

Guisborough Providence Board School 1878

The plaque records the fact that the Guisborough Providence Schools were originally erected in 1792 in Westgate by George Venables  a London businessman who visited Guisborough. He died 12th April 1813 and is buried in the Tower of London
Providence School

The current building was rebuilt by the Guisborough School Board in 1878
Guisborough Board School 1878
On the 1894 OS map the road is known as Providence Street rather than the current Rectory Lane.

Guisborough Board School 1878

The current building ceased to be a school in 1968 and in 1981 was bought by the Territorial Association Social Club,

Aysdalegate Junction

The posting was originally one I made for my “Our Industrial Heartland” project

One of the critical factors in the success of the industry in our project area was the construction of the Cleveland Railway, this was opened in November 1861 between the Skelton Old Shaft mines and Normanby Jetty, extending toward Boosbeck in 1862.  Branches were also constructed to Slapewath, Stanghow and Aysdalegate mines.
With the construction of the railways came numerous interesting bridges, tunnels and culverts.

This culvert (in orange) carries a stream under the branch line which went to Slapewath Mine
Culvert under branch to Slapewath
This small tunnel (yellow) went under the same branch line, but was dry for livestock and people to cross under the railway.
Underpass on branch to Slapewath
This much more sizeable tunnel (red) passed under the main line.
Underpass below main line at Slapewath branch
Considering they date from the 1860’s, they are all in excellent condition.

Tocketts Mill – National Mills Weekend 2017 – Sunday 14th May

Tockett’s Watermill, near Guisborough

A 4-storey corn mill built in the 18th century. Completely restored in 1990s, with an 18-ft pitchback waterwheel, three pairs of stones and a full set of ancillary machinery. Fully operational, producing flour.

NATIONAL MILLS WEEKEND OPENING TIMES 2017
SUNDAY 14TH MAY ONLY, 14.00-16.00.

Guisborough Steam Corn Mill

A Tees Archaeology report states that the Guisborough Co-operative Corn Milling Society established the steam powered Mill in 1856.

Guisborough Steam Corn MillThe arch of a cartway into the mill yard can still be seen on the three story building. The modern 1850 datestone seems to disagree with the 1856 plaque.

Guisborough Steam Corn Mill

A hinge remains from an older door or gate.

Guisborough Steam Corn Mill

Guisborough Steam Corn Mill

I have found reference in the 1883 Co-operative Wholesale Society Annual to the ‘Guisborough Provident Industrial Corn Mill Society’ being established in 1856, registered in May 1863 and dissolved in 1871

Cleveland Railway Embankment – Guisborough

Building work in Guisborough briefly revealed stonework from the original route of the Cleveland Railway which opened in 1861 as a freight line for the local ironstone mines, the original route continued west over a wooden viaduct and skirted the southern edge of the Eston hills.

Capture

In 1865 the Cleveland Railway, Middlesbrough and Guisborough Railway and Stockton and Darlington Railway were all taken over by the North Eastern Railway, the route quickly became redundant and closed in 1873 after only 12 years of use.

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By mid-March the location was lost forever, although this old photo from Guisborough History Notes shows the same abutment

Hutton Hall, Guisborough

Hutton Hall was built in 1866 for Sir Joseph Whitwell Pease, the son of Joseph Pease one of the key players in the Stockton & Darlington Railway
Hutton Hall, Guisborough
Pease became first Baronet of Hutton Lowcross and Pinchinthorpe in 1882.

In 1902 a Bank crash forced the Pease family to sell the Hutton Hall estate, this photo is from the sale catalogue
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During the Spanish Civil War the Hall was used to house Basque refugee children.