Belmont Ironstone Mine

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The second phase of working at Belmont started in 1907-1908 after the original working there ceased around 1886.

Hunters Hill Farm consists of a large range of building which constituted the stables and workshops of the mine, close to the road is a huge concrete wall which one supported one end of the tipping gantry where railway wagons were loaded.

Belmont Ironstone Mine, Guisborough  Belmont Ironstone Mine Tipping Gantry, Guisborough

Belmont Ironstone Mine Tipping Gantry, Guisborough  Belmont Ironstone Mine Tipping Gantry, Guisborough

Continuing a short way up the path you first reach the collapsed drift entrance with an electrical sub-station next to it, the remains of ceramic insulators can be seen in its back wall.
Belmont Ironstone Mine Drift, Guisborough  Belmont Ironstone Mine Substation, Guisborough

Belmont Ironstone Mine Substation, Guisborough

A little further up the hill again stands a powder house now filled with earth.

Belmont Ironstone Mine Powder House, Guisborough  Belmont Ironstone Mine Powder House, Guisborough

Belmont Ironstone Mine Powder House, Guisborough

I also noticed that the nearby allotments have a vegetable bed constructed from Pease bricks, although as Pease never ran Belmont they could just be anomalous
Belmont Ironstone Mine, Pease Brick

Waterfall Ironstone Mine

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Waterfall mine was worked between 1892 and 1901, the ironstone here is very close to the surface and under a layer of sand and clay, the dangerous working conditions gave this mine the nickname “Linger and Die”

Waterfall Ironstone Mine Waterfall Ironstone Mine

The whole site is now obscured by a plantation, although hints of a cutting/drift can be seen towards the east corner where the path of a railway can be seen heading across fields on the aerial photo.

Waterfall Viaduct, Slapewath

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The 8 arch Waterfall viaduct carried the Cleveland Railway which served many of the ironstone mines in this area, it is very close to the main road, but becoming harder to see over the years as trees grow around it.

Waterfall Viaduct, Slapewath 

Just to the west, on the approach to the Spa Wood ironstone mine is another interesting bridge with offset stonework.

Railway Bridge, Slapewath Railway Bridge, Slapewath

Spa Wood Ironstone Mine

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Ironstone was extracted from Spa Wood mine between March 1853 and December 1928.

Approaching from the east through large mine spoil heaps currently used by bikers, you first encounter a powder magazine

Spa Wood Ironstone Mine Spa Wood Ironstone Mine Spa Wood Ironstone Mine

Close by are the bricked up travelling and main drifts.

Spa Wood Ironstone Mine Spa Wood Ironstone Mine

In the next area to the west of the drifts are the offices and workshops which are still largely intact, having been part of a scrapyard until recent years. A chimney also stood here which was only recently demolished.

Spa Wood Ironstone Mine Spa Wood Ironstone Mine

Further west stand the remains of two fan houses for ventilating the mine workings. Finally to the extreme west of the site stands an electrical sub-station from the later years of electrication

Spa Wood Ironstone Mine

UPDATE : This location has since been purchased as a private residence and should no longer be visited.