From the First to the Fourth Industrial Revolution

A talk on 3D Photogrammetry and Photo Merging using modern digital technology to create three dimensional digital models and time slider photos.

By Adrian Glasser
volunteer with the Land of Iron Project
Friday 8th February 7pm
St. Matthew’s Church, Grosmont
Refreshments provided £3 donation towards funds

The Land of Iron project is a Heritage Lottery Funded project in the North York Moors National Park which is conserving, protecting and promoting the remains of the ironstone mining industry which was active around Rosedale from the mid 1800’s to 1926.

Although the subject matter of the Land of Iron project is from a by-gone era, the project is actively utilizing modern digital technology, including 3D recording of archeological sites and drone and hand-held camera photogrammetry, the process of using digital photographs to reconstruct three dimensional, digital models of objects, buildings and sites. We are currently in the midst’s of what is being called the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Recent digital technological advancements such as the internet, 3D scanning, computer aided design, coding, 3D printing, laser cutting, digital manufacturing, robotics, electronics and microcontrollers are transforming our lives. The Fourth Industrial Revolution is being driven by an explosion of knowledge and information that is readily accessible to virtually everybody to learn how to use these digital technologies to do and make virtually anything. In this talk, I will show, describe and demonstrate some of the Land of Iron projects that are using readily accessible, inexpensive and often free, digital technologies and software. This includes web based ‘time-sliders’ that that allow users to control the transition between original and modern photographs of sites in the Land of Iron project and a fully automated, but simple, motor controlled, geared, cardboard cut-out, photogrammetry turntable that rotates small objects and triggers a camera to capture photographs to reconstruct three dimensional models of artifacts. Although the talk will be of a technical nature, it is intended to appeal to adults and children of all ages and technical abilities. Please, everybody, come along to learn how technology from the Fourth Industrial Revolution is helping us to learn about what went on during the First Industrial Revolution.

Inland Jet Mining In the North York Moors – Friday 20th October

Jet has become so inextricably linked with the sea cliffs around Whitby that many people are now unaware that it was extensively mined throughout the North York Moors and Cleveland Hills.

Hear about the research work of the North York Moors Caving Club and the Cleveland Mining Heritage Society in surveying this nearly forgotten industry in a talk by Chris Twigg

Friday 20th October 7pm
St. Matthew’s Church, Grosmont
Tickets £3 donation to church funds
Refreshments included.

End of Paddy Waddells Railway – Glaisdale

The scheme to build Paddy Waddells Railway (or Cleveland Extension Mineral Railway to give its full name) was started in 1872 and intended to connect Kilton Thorpe to the ironworks at Glaisdale. The scheme struggled financially from the outset as the Eskdale mines and furnaces in the South all struggled, whilst iron mining and production became concentrated to the North in Cleveland. After year of inactivity the scheme was finally scrapped in the 1889. Glaisdale Ironworks having already closed by this point anyway.
Many parts of the infrastructure of the line were constructed, even though no trains ever ran.
End of Paddy Waddells
This bridge was constructed at Rake House in Glaisdale to carry the road over the railway.
End of Paddy Waddells

Aysdalegate Junction

The posting was originally one I made for my “Our Industrial Heartland” project

One of the critical factors in the success of the industry in our project area was the construction of the Cleveland Railway, this was opened in November 1861 between the Skelton Old Shaft mines and Normanby Jetty, extending toward Boosbeck in 1862.  Branches were also constructed to Slapewath, Stanghow and Aysdalegate mines.
With the construction of the railways came numerous interesting bridges, tunnels and culverts.

This culvert (in orange) carries a stream under the branch line which went to Slapewath Mine
Culvert under branch to Slapewath
This small tunnel (yellow) went under the same branch line, but was dry for livestock and people to cross under the railway.
Underpass on branch to Slapewath
This much more sizeable tunnel (red) passed under the main line.
Underpass below main line at Slapewath branch
Considering they date from the 1860’s, they are all in excellent condition.

Picton Junction Brickworks

The remains of of the Picton brickworks stand adjacent to the Eaglescliffe to Northallerton line just north of what was Picton railway station.
Picton Brickworks
It was opened by the Picton Junction Brick and Tile Company in the 1920s, using a 20ft layer of clay just below the surface (the flooded pits are immediately to the east)
Picton Brickworks
There are 5 double ended Newcastle Kilns which are 38ft long (the chimney is central with a loading entrance and stoke holes at either end)
Picton Brickworks
The kiln with the brick front still contains the last load of un-fired bricks which date from its closure in 1938.
Picton Brickworks

Blackstone No.1 Digger, Port Mulgrave

Buried in the undergrowth at the side of Cleveland Way near the cliff top at Port Mulgrave are the rusting remains of a Blackstone No.1 Digger
Blackstone No.1 Digger, Port Mulgrave
Blackstone & Co were based in Stamford, Lincolnshire, United Kingdom. This piece of farm machinery was a potato spinner and probably dates from the 1930s as Lister took over Blackstone & Co in 1937 to form Lister Blackstone.
Blackstone No.1 Digger, Port Mulgrave
Here is an intact model.
Blackstone Digger potato spinner at Woolpit 2009

1949 Industrial Adverts, Middlesbrough / Darlington

First batch that I posted on Facebook this week, thought it a good idea to post them here too as not everyone uses Facebook and if it didn’t just happen you’ll never find it.

Gjers Mills & Co, Ayresome Ironworks, Middlesbrough
Gjers Mills & Co, Ayresome Ironworks 1949

Darlington Railway Plant & Foundry, Bank Top
Darlington Railway Plant & Foundary 1949

Davy and United, Roll Foundry, Billingham
Davy and United, Roll Foundry, Billingham / Middlesbrough 1949

River Tees Conservancy Commissioners
River Tees Conservancy Comission 1949