Bent Rigg Coastguard Lookout

When built in 1935 this was designated as an Auxiliary Coastguard Watch Station
Bent Rigg Coastguard Lookout
Between 1939 and 1945 it became a War Watch station, insulators on the rear of the building indicate its telephone connection to the adjacent Radar Station.
The building remained in use by the coastguard until 1972 and was rennovated in 1999 as part of the Heritage Coast Project.
Bent Rigg Coastguard Lookout
Bent Rigg Coastguard Lookout

It still commands excellent views over the coast.

Ravenscar Radar Station

The radar station was constructed in 1941 as part of the Coastal Defence/Chain Home Low early warning system. It was designated site M47 and the original radar was mounted on top of the semi-circular transmitter and receiving hut as shown in the illustration.
a Ravenscar Radar Station
Ravenscar Radar Station
The site was later upgraded to be part of the Chain Home Extra Low system and was redesignated K47, with a new Transmitter and Receiving block.
Ravenscar Radar Station
There are two smaller buildings, one of which housed a generator and the other a fuel store.
Ravenscar Radar Station
At the other end of the field near the old railway, the bases of several accommodation blocks can be see, but none of the structure remains.
Ravenscar Radar Station

Whitaker Brick Company, Ravenscar

This brickworks was setup in 1900 to provide bricks for the nearby Ravenscar development that never materialised, it is located inside an old Alum quarry.

The remains of the single large Hoffman Kiln are still to be found on the site.
Ravenscar Brick Works
Although heavily overgrown the outer doors can still be identified
Ravenscar Brick Works
Ravenscar Brick Works
Despite the failure of Ravenscar, the brickworks was next to the railway and found work supplying bricks to Scarbrorough until the 1930s. The chinmeys on the site remained in place until demolition in the 1960s.
A bridge nearby still stands that carried the abanboned Whitby to Scarborough line
Ravenscar Brick Works

Ravenscar Railway Tunnel

The tunnel was buiilt around 1885 and stands on the abandoned Scarborough-Whitby line
Ravenscar Tunnel
The tunnel was cut so W.H. Hammond, the lord of Raven Hall, didn’t have to see the railway actually crossing his land.
Ravenscar Tunnel
The tunnel is only 279 yards long but has a sharp curve and with the gradient up to Ravenscar being 1-in-39 it proved troublesome for many trains.
Ravenscar Tunnel