Skinningrove Pillbox

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This Second World War Pillbox now rests on the beach, just to the north of Skinningrove
Skinningrove Pill Box
It was originally higher up the cliff, but has fallen here due to coastal erosion over the last 70 years.
Skinningrove Pill Box
It actually upside down as the doorway would have been at ground level.
Skinningrove Pill Box

The remains of the metal shutters to cover the firing position are still in place.
Skinningrove Pill Box

Great Ayton Wicker Soldier

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The solider was first erected in 2014 to mark the 100th anniversary of the start of World War 1.
Wicker Soldier, Great Ayton

Woollen medals knitted by the Great Ayton Knit and Knatter group are put on the soldier on the day each one was killed, also a minutes silence is held at the village war memorial on the exact centenary of their death.
War Memorial, Great Ayton

The project will continue into 2018 by which time all 50 who were killed will have been remembered.

Wicker Soldier, Great Ayton

 

John Buntings War Memorial Chapel, Scotch Corner

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Not the Scotch Corner on the A66 but a hill near Sutton Bank, but either way after over 10 years of Hidden Teesside I have finally added a new category to the site called ‘Yes I know its not in Teesside’ to cover things that may be a short drive away.

This chapel was built by sculptor John Bunting as a memorial for those killed in the Second World War, he acquired the derelict farm buildings in 1956 and completed the rebuild in 1957.

John Bunting, War Memorial Chapel, Scotch Corner

It specifically commemorates three people all educated at Ampleforth College

Hugh Dormer, killed during the battle of Europe in 1944
Michael Fenwick, a poet killed in 1941 at Kowloon.
Michael Allmand, who was killed in Europe in 1944 and received the Victoria Cross

John Bunting, War Memorial Chapel, Scotch Corner

The chapel will next be open to the public on: Saturday 15th April 2017; Sunday 9th July 2017; Saturday September 9th 2017 and there is a huge amount of information available at http://www.johnbunting.co.uk/memorial.html

John Bunting, War Memorial Chapel, Scotch Corner

Saltburn air-raid shelter

Paul Smith kindly shared these photos and details of air raid shelter in his own garden.
During WW2, the couple that then lived in our home had a custom built shelter dug! She wanted her own shelter, especially after 6 houses were brought down in an air raid! He, was a retired civil engineer, and hence a pretty nifty piece of work!
Scroll on to 2014, by which time the roof had long been removed, a concrete slab, and the hole filled in and a garden created to our having to dig up said garden to find source of damp problem – blocked air bricks which had been covered over with concrete when garden recreated! We found the top step which, had a pivot hole at one end and decided to dig down! The rest you can see, nobody in the street remembers it but one gentleman, now in his late 80’s, does remember the shelter being there.

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Ripon Camp Memorial

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Ripon Camp was a vast First World War camp, it could accommodate 30,000 troops and an estimated 350,000 men passed through during the course of the war.

Ripon Camp Memorial

A huge military hospital with 670 beds stood opposite the turning to Studley Roger, this was demolished after the war and is where the memorial now stands, of the site of the chapel and canteen.

Ripon Camp Memorial

A collection of photos can be found courtesy of the Kings Own Royal Regiment.

Commondale Shepherds War Memorial

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This remote war memorial carries the following inscription
War Memorial, Commondale Moor
For Remembrance Guardsmen Robbie Leggott killed in action 1916 Alf Cockerill died of wounds 1920 duty 1914.
War Memorial, Commondale Moor

 

Some research was done on Rootchat which follows :-

In 1914 they both went to London together and joined the Grenadier Guards. Robert Leggott lied about his age, he was only 17. He was killed in 1916 on the Somme aged 19 an his bodied never found. His name is on the Thiepval Memorial in Flanders. In July 1916 the 4th Battalion Grenadier Guards were holding trenches near Ypres. They were attacks on both sides of their position resulting in close quarter fighting and shelling. There was also sniper activity. In these actions Alfred Cockerill was wounded in the head. Alf was sent home. Back in UK, he was declare unfit for any futher duty. His head wound had serious damaged him. He now had epilepsy and would never return to the moors. He was one of the many head injuries and shellshock cases places in mental hospitals. He was sent to the Chalfont Colony opened 1894 by The National Society for the Employment of Epileptics, Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire. He spent four years there, dying at the Epilepsia Colony on 11th August 1920 of Epilepsy and Meningitis.

Bolckow and Vaughan – World War 1 Roll of Honour

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Bolckow and Vaughan created this plaque to commemorate their 670 employees who died in the Great War. It was made by C.F. Mundell and Company, Tees Joinery Works, Marsh Road, Middlesbrough.Each plaque is split up into the works or mine they originated from, zooming in on Flickr will allow you to read every name.
Bolckow and Vaughan - WW1 Roll of Honour
Middlesbrough Office, Middlesbrough Works, South Bank Works
Bolckow and Vaughan - WW1 Roll of Honour
West Auckland Colliery, Shildon Lodge Colliery, Byers Green Colliery, Newfield Colliery, Black Boy Colliery, Auckland Park Colliery
Bolckow and Vaughan - WW1 Roll of Honour
Leasingthorne Colliery, Westerton Colliery, Dean & Chapter Colliery
Bolckow and Vaughan - WW1 Roll of Honour
Newlandside Quarry, Eston Mines, North Skelton Mines, South Skelton Mines, Belmont Mines
Bolckow and Vaughan - WW1 Roll of Honour
The plaque is currently on display at Kirkleatham Museum