Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

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Warren Moor has the only standing chimney of any ironstone mine in the area, dating from the 1860s
Warren Moor Ironstone Mine Warren Moor Ironstone Mine Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

A completely flooded 220ft downcast shaft can be seen from the path.

Warren Moor Ironstone Mine  Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

Between the two shafts are the foundations of a winding engine.

Warren Moor Ironstone Mine Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

A vaulted roof leads from the foundations of a pumping house to the upcast shaft.

Warren Moor Ironstone Mine Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

Warren Moor Ironstone Mine Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

The upcast shaft is estimated to be 150ft deep, not reaching the Main Seam ironstone and not connected to the downcast hence the differing water levels in each.

Warren Moor Ironstone Mine Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

A number of surface drifts can be seen on the hillside to the north east which worked the Top Seam.

2 thoughts on “Warren Moor Ironstone Mine

  1. Excellent post – well done! As you can guess this prompted a visit!

    In addition to the above remnants are earthworks relating to the branch line linking the site to the mainline. The chimney appears to be in excellent condition after the restoration. Just to hark back to my favourite topic, it is a pity there is no information board at the site……

    • There is an information boardroom nownow. This Exploited Land of Iron (NYMNP) has a working group tidying up and conserving the site together with archeological exploration. For more info google This Exploited Land of Iron or North York Moors National Park.

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