Upleatham Hall

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Upleatham Hall dated from the 17th century and was worked on over the years by John Carr , Sir Robert Smirke and Ignatius Bonomi. It was the seat of the Earl of Zetland.
Upleatham Hall
hall
In 1897 subsidence due to intentional ironstone mining lead to the house being demolished.
Upleatham A
This decorative panel on the wall of a current building on the site looks like it might be part of the original.
Part of Upleatham Hall ?

7 thoughts on “Upleatham Hall

  1. Hi Chris – Another epic loss for Cleveland…a crime to undermine that…what were these idiots thinking??? I walk the dog up there a lot and have met the guy who lives on the Hall site a few times. The house with the frieze was a new build about 15-20 years ago approx and he told me the frieze had nothing to do with the old Hall, it came form somewhere down south. And just for the record, he didnt build the house, he is the 2nd occupier i think he said.

  2. I read about this in Simon’s excellent book on the subject, and was shocked to read about the cavalier attitude of the landowner who having built the house allowed it to be undermined. You could say that it was greed in that he wanted to get the maximum royalty from the stone obtained!

  3. I read about this in Simon’s excellent book on the subject, and was shocked to read about the cavalier attitude of the landowner who having built the house allowed it to be undermined. You could say that it was greed in that he wanted to get the maximum royalty from the stone obtained!

  4. The entrance to Capon Hall Farm in Upleatham Village is worth further investigation. It’s grand pillared entrance looks somewhat incongruous and could originate from Upleatham Hall remains.

  5. Callum Duff: the original gateposts used to stand on the roadside and were removed sometime in the late 1980s. I happened to be passing as one top was removed. a curve of stone wall is still visible on google maps, opposite the triangle of trees

    The ha-ha is still standing for the hall, and visible on google sat. maps

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