Lingdale Mine Horses Mosaic

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Large horses such as Shires and Cleveland Bays were still in use across Cleveland for well over 100 years, into the late 1950s. Robin, Bishop and Duke were the last at Lingdale and feature in this photo as well as the mosaic.

Albert Dobson of Carney Street, Boosbeck; Gus Coote and Clarence ‘Clarry’ Ditchburn of Moorsholm leading out the mine horses on August 28th 1959 – Alison Small, Lingdale History

The mosaic was the idea of Lingdale Liftoff, funded by Coast and Country and created by Glynis Johnson and the children of Lingdale Primary in 2013 (according to the tiles around the outside)

Unfortunately the background is slightly damaged at the top left, but hopefully it can be repaired before before spreading to the main subject.

Lingdale Mine Horse Mosaic
Lingdale Mine Horses

Lingdale Trappy Boy

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Lockdown continues to make adding to the site more tricky, but I was able to capture these images while out at work. He is located inside the grounds Lingdale Primary School, so should not be visited without permission.

Lingdale Mine Trappy Lad
Trappy Boy

A trappy boy/lad was a child as young as 12, who worked in the ironstone mines opening and closing the air ventilation doors as horses and mine tub passed.

Image result for trappy lad
A real trappy lad

The sculpture was the idea of the Lingdale Lift-off group and looks to the work of J. Godbold of Egton, who also made the ironstone statues at Boosbeck and Eston. He was originally intended to mark a footpath to Kilton Mine, hence pointing his finger.

Lingdale Mine Trappy Lad

Cliff House, Marske

Cliff House was built as a summer residence by Sir Joseph Pease in 1844. Sir Joseph was heavily involved with establishing the Stockton and Darlington Railway and the Middlesbrough Estate.

Cliff House, Marske
Cliff House

This Pease Family involvement in the area predates the opening of the Upleatham Ironstone Mine at New Marske in 1851 and his brother Sir Henry’s historic visit to Saltburn in 1859 after which he developed that resort.

The 1911 census shows 6 members of the Pease Family still in residence with 6 members of staff.

With the closure of the Upleatham Ironstone mine in 1924, the Pease family influence may have decreased and Cliff House passes to the Holiday Fellowship in 1934, several postcards exist of it in that time.

Thomas Arthur Leonard developed outdoor holidays for working people through the Holiday Fellowship. He also helped to establish the Youth Hostels Association and the Ramblers’ Association.

Cliff House – Holiday Fellowship
1938 Conservatory

The Holiday Fellowship apparently moved out around 1974 and after a period of dereliction the building became a retirement home in 1981.

Skinningrove Methodist Chapel

The Methodist chapel in Skinningrove dates from 1873 and is still active today.

Skinningrove Chapel
Skinningrove Chapel

Northern Echo – Wednesday 30 July 1873

PRIMITIVE, METHODIST CHAPEL AT SKINNINGROVE. FOUNDATION STONE LAYING. The ceremony of laying the foundation of a new Primitive Methodist Chapel at Skinningrove took place on Monday. For many years the Primitive Methodists conducted services alone in Skinningrove. When there were little more than a dozen houses they held cottage meetings, and it has had a place on the circuit plan for thirty years. When, through the enterprising firm of the Messrs. Pease, the population had increased to near 1,500, it was felt that this long toil should not be thrown away, but that there should be a fresh effort to meet the spiritual requirements of the population, and a site was generously granted by the late Earl of Zetland, The day being fine, there was a large gathering, and a procession, composed chiefly of working men, sang through the streets. The Rev. W. BAITEY, superintendent, began the service by giving out a hymn. The Rev.J. Wilson, Congregational minister, offered prayer. The Rev. J. G. Binney, from the Theological Institute, recently appointed as second minister, read suitable portions of scripture. The Rev. W. BAITEY, addressing Mr. W. Cockburn, who had kindly consented to lay the stone, remarked that it gave them all pleasure to see Mr. Cockburn in their midst, with his excellent lady, and likewise Mr. Francis. Mr. Cockburn had been permitted, through the providence of God, to aid in laying the foundation of a thriving industry in many village, and memorials of his devising mind would be found when he was gone. Today, he came to aid in laying the foundation of another house of prayer. Mr. Baitey then handed to Mr. Cockburn a bottle to enclose in the stone, and a silver trowel and mallet. The bottle contained a copy of the Primitive Methodist paper the Northern Echo of that day; the .British Workman, having a, portrait of Gurney Pease, Esq.; lines written by Mr. Horsley on the death of Charles Pease, Esq., a Circuit Plan, the names of the Trustees, and Members in Society, letters of Mir. Cockburn and Mr. Francis expressing their readiness to assist in the undertaking, and which, if ever exhumed, which they might be after cenrturies have gone by, all show how worthily the early managers of the firm represented the well. known spirit and principles of the masters. There was also a short record of those who took part in the services, and gratitude expressed to Mr. D. Trotter and Mr. D. Maclean, agents of the Earl of Zetland, for their kind assistance.

Mr Cockburn next deposited upon the stone a cheque for 10 shillings. Mr. J. Tyerman, a working man, and one whose devoutness is known in all the villages round about, laid on the stone the handsome donation of 5 shillings. Numerous other donations were laid on the stone, from two pounds to the child’s sixpence, making a total of over 38 shillings. Nearly 300 sat down to tea in the old School-room. The evening meeting was presided over by Mr. W. Cockburn, who spoke of our intellectual, social, moral, and spiritual duties. Other gentlemen and ministers also addressed the meeting. The total proceeds of the day amounted to about 60 shillings. The building is a Gothic structure. The architect is T. Southron, of South Shields.

Spirit of East Cleveland, Skelton

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This new statue in triibute to local ironstone miners, was unveiled on 6th April 2019 by children from Skelton Primary and Craig Hornby, director of ‘A Century in Stone’

Spirit of East Cleveland, Skelton

The project was organised by the Friends of Skelton Community Orchard – FOSCO with the sculpture being created by Bill Harling.

Spirit of East Cleveland, Skelton
The miner on the right is carrying a midge lamp and holding a Blackett-Hutton rotary drill.
Spirit of East Cleveland, Skelton
The central miner is checking the roof with a long bar for any loose ironstone waiting to fall.
Spirit of East Cleveland, Skelton
The miner on the left is loading a large chuck of ironstone
Spirit of East Cleveland, Skelton
A rat watches over the scene from the rear.

From the First to the Fourth Industrial Revolution

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A talk on 3D Photogrammetry and Photo Merging using modern digital technology to create three dimensional digital models and time slider photos.

By Adrian Glasser
volunteer with the Land of Iron Project
Friday 8th February 7pm
St. Matthew’s Church, Grosmont
Refreshments provided £3 donation towards funds

The Land of Iron project is a Heritage Lottery Funded project in the North York Moors National Park which is conserving, protecting and promoting the remains of the ironstone mining industry which was active around Rosedale from the mid 1800’s to 1926.

Although the subject matter of the Land of Iron project is from a by-gone era, the project is actively utilizing modern digital technology, including 3D recording of archeological sites and drone and hand-held camera photogrammetry, the process of using digital photographs to reconstruct three dimensional, digital models of objects, buildings and sites. We are currently in the midst’s of what is being called the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Recent digital technological advancements such as the internet, 3D scanning, computer aided design, coding, 3D printing, laser cutting, digital manufacturing, robotics, electronics and microcontrollers are transforming our lives. The Fourth Industrial Revolution is being driven by an explosion of knowledge and information that is readily accessible to virtually everybody to learn how to use these digital technologies to do and make virtually anything. In this talk, I will show, describe and demonstrate some of the Land of Iron projects that are using readily accessible, inexpensive and often free, digital technologies and software. This includes web based ‘time-sliders’ that that allow users to control the transition between original and modern photographs of sites in the Land of Iron project and a fully automated, but simple, motor controlled, geared, cardboard cut-out, photogrammetry turntable that rotates small objects and triggers a camera to capture photographs to reconstruct three dimensional models of artifacts. Although the talk will be of a technical nature, it is intended to appeal to adults and children of all ages and technical abilities. Please, everybody, come along to learn how technology from the Fourth Industrial Revolution is helping us to learn about what went on during the First Industrial Revolution.

Thursday 8th November – Errington Woods & Upleatham

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Skelton History Group

Thursday 8th November – Errington Woods & Upleatham

Distance: 3¾ miles; Ascent 395ft; Duration 3½-4 hours We set off at 10:30am from the car park at Errington Woods (NZ 618201). The walk is a circular walk, done in a clockwise direction, mostly on or near a contour level. The heritage will cover the ironstone mine at Upleatham, its association with the mine at Hob Hill, Saltburn, and the village and Hall at Upleatham.

A charge of £2 per person will be made on each walk to offset the costs of Insurance. Please wear appropriate footwear and have clothing suitable for the likely weather conditions on that day. It is suggested that you bring food and drink as we usually stop between midday and 1:00pm for a lunch break.

Further details can be had from: skeltonhistorygroup@gmail.com or by contacting Peter Appleton (Tel: 01287 281752)

Underground Exploration in the Esk Valley – 12th March 2018

CLEVELAND INDUSTRIAL ARCHAEOLOGY SOCIETY LECTURE
Underground Exploration of some of the Mines in the Esk Valley

By Simon Chapman author of Grosmont and its mines
Monday 12th March at 7:30 pm
Saltburn Community Centre Hall

In recent years members of the Cleveland Mining Heritage Society have been clearing, identifying and exploring some of the mines along the Esk Valley. This is a rare chance to see some images and hear about the work undertaken by the group in association with the landowners. Simon Chapman, author of Grosmont and its Mines, Commondale Mine etc. will tell the story of some of these mines and give a glimpse of a moment in time long since hidden.

Cleveland Railway Bridge, Flatts Lane

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The Cleveland Railway opened in 1861 as a freight line for the local ironstone mines, but the route quickly became duplicated and redundant and closed in 1873, after only 12 years of use.

Capture

This sandstone wall marks where the line crossed over Flatts Lane as it turned North towards Middlesbrough.

Cleveland Railway

An excellent account of the Cleveland Railway can be found in Andrew Pearson’s comment on this previous post