End of Paddy Waddells Railway – Glaisdale

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The scheme to build Paddy Waddells Railway (or Cleveland Extension Mineral Railway to give its full name) was started in 1872 and intended to connect Kilton Thorpe to the ironworks at Glaisdale. The scheme struggled financially from the outset as the Eskdale mines and furnaces in the South all struggled, whilst iron mining and production became concentrated to the North in Cleveland. After year of inactivity the scheme was finally scrapped in the 1889. Glaisdale Ironworks having already closed by this point anyway.
Many parts of the infrastructure of the line were constructed, even though no trains ever ran.
End of Paddy Waddells
This bridge was constructed at Rake House in Glaisdale to carry the road over the railway.
End of Paddy Waddells

Rosedale Local History Weekend

 

rose

22nd& 23rd APRIL , 11.00 – 4.30 p.m.     FREE ENTRY.

At Updale Reading Room (Village Hall),  Rosedale. 

OS Outdoor Leisure 26 1:25,000, grid reference SE713 975

Post code YO18 8RQ
Exhibition and display, walks to the mines (both days), a talk by local Mines and Railway expert, Malcolm Bisby and local art and craft.  Refreshments.

Rosedale History Society, in association with “The Land of Iron” HLF funded project currently underway here in Rosedale and in the Esk Valley, is holding a weekend exhibition of archive material including photographs, maps and plans, artefacts and much more.  There will be plenty to see for the industrial history enthusiasts, including loaned items from Ryedale Folk Museum, and not forgetting the stories of wives and children of the miners and railwaymen, and Rosedale’s own social history.

There will be some hands-on activities for children, information on local wildlife and the opportunity to find out more about the “Land of Iron” project with information for upcoming volunteer opportunities.

If you feel like being involved in archaeology, surveys and a bit of clearing and digging, here’s your chance!

Scarborough artist, Andrew Cheetham, will be displaying work he produced while Artist in Residence here in Rosedale in 2010.   Also, the Rosedale Art & Craft Group will showcase their high quality art and craft mixed media work, some available to buy.

WALKS: on both days there will be a guided walk to the mine sites of Rosedale East.  These are free for both adults and children (aged 11 and over) starting from the Reading Room at 2.00p.m., returning approximately 4.30p.m. Please bring walking boots and bottled water.  Well behaved dogs on leads are welcome.

 TALK:  Malcolm Bisby, our very popular local mines and railway expert will give a talk with slides at Rosedale Abbey Church at 6.00p.m. on SATURDAY 22ndFree entry with a collection for the Church Roof Appeal.

All are most welcome to these events.  Wheelchair friendly.

Tel. 01751-417071 or email rosedalehistory@hotmail.co.uk

Go to http://rosedale.ryedaleconnect.org.uk/history for more information and directions.

North Skelton Miners Payslip

Theres lots of information held within this payslip that Gavin Brett shared, theres quite a bit thats difficult to read so I will add to this over time.

Dorman Long and Co. North Skelton Mines, 9th November 1935.
The payslip is for two people, G Thornton and  (J Barnet ?) suggesting they were working as a team, probably one breaking the rock and one filling the tubs.
Their token number is 163, this would allow the weighman to record the stone extracted by them at surface.
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They only worked 1.5 days and extracted over 29 tons of ironstone and a small amount of sulphur (this sits in a thin band at the top of the ironstone)

Theres a small amount paid for a consideration I can’t read.

The district percentage might apply if a certain area was more difficult to work than other parts of the mine.

8% piecework award, not sure yet.

Yards I suspect would be for driving passages through unproductive ground.
received_955300887933594
They are paying for their own blasting powder, its not provided.

The checkweightmans fund it most likely to pay for an impartial individual to confirm that the mine owners internal weighman is not underpaying the miners.

Northumberland and Durham Miners Permanent Relief Fund Friendly Society – Established in 1862, following the Hartley Pit Disaster, for provision of relief to miners and their families in case of fatal accidents or permanent disablement. The fund was wound up in 1995.

received_955300851266931

The amount earned is equivalent to about £90 today, so not much for 1.5 days work by two people

Mining Geology Of The North York Moors – Friday 3rd February

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Mining Geology Of The North York Moors By Dr Steve Liverast
Local Jurassic rocks include Ironstone, Coal, Cement, Jet, Building Stone and Alum
Find out about the formation and resulting mining of these ores
Friday 3rd February at 7pm
St. Matthew’s Church, Grosmont
Donation of £3 includes refreshments

We are very fortunate to have a superb sequence of rocks across the North York Moors. They helped pioneering geologists define the early framework of the science and continue to be used to train the next generations. However the rocks have also been exploited throughout human history to build prosperity and develop the region. The Jurassic section spans some 50 million years of deposit and contains a large variety of ore minerals including ironstone, coal, cement, jet, building stone and alum. Each ore required unique environmental conditions for its formation and the talk will outline what these were and illustrate the resulting mining activity used in extraction.

The photo shows Cleveland Ironstone seams and infilled mine adits near Staithes

Hutton Hall, Guisborough

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Hutton Hall was built in 1866 for Sir Joseph Whitwell Pease, the son of Joseph Pease one of the key players in the Stockton & Darlington Railway
Hutton Hall, Guisborough
Pease became first Baronet of Hutton Lowcross and Pinchinthorpe in 1882.

In 1902 a Bank crash forced the Pease family to sell the Hutton Hall estate, this photo is from the sale catalogue
5-10-49-01-guisborough-jp-front

During the Spanish Civil War the Hall was used to house Basque refugee children.

Ironstone Talk – St. Matthew’s Church, Grosmont at 7pm on Friday 9th September,

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In recent years  members of the Cleveland Mining Heritage Society have been clearing, identifying and exploring some of the mines along the Esk Valley. This is a rare chance to see some images and hear about the work undertaken by the group in association with the landowners. Simon Chapman, author of Grosmont and its Mines, Commondale Mine etc. wiil tell the story of some of these mines and give a glimpse of a moment in time long since hidden.

The talk will be held in St. Matthew’s Church, Grosmont at 7pm on Friday 9th September, at the start of the national heritage weekend. Tickets cost £3, refreshments will be provided and all proceeds go towards the church, which incidentally sits on top of some of the earliest of Cleveland’s ironstone mines.

Bolckow and Vaughan – World War 1 Roll of Honour

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Bolckow and Vaughan created this plaque to commemorate their 670 employees who died in the Great War. It was made by C.F. Mundell and Company, Tees Joinery Works, Marsh Road, Middlesbrough.Each plaque is split up into the works or mine they originated from, zooming in on Flickr will allow you to read every name.
Bolckow and Vaughan - WW1 Roll of Honour
Middlesbrough Office, Middlesbrough Works, South Bank Works
Bolckow and Vaughan - WW1 Roll of Honour
West Auckland Colliery, Shildon Lodge Colliery, Byers Green Colliery, Newfield Colliery, Black Boy Colliery, Auckland Park Colliery
Bolckow and Vaughan - WW1 Roll of Honour
Leasingthorne Colliery, Westerton Colliery, Dean & Chapter Colliery
Bolckow and Vaughan - WW1 Roll of Honour
Newlandside Quarry, Eston Mines, North Skelton Mines, South Skelton Mines, Belmont Mines
Bolckow and Vaughan - WW1 Roll of Honour
The plaque is currently on display at Kirkleatham Museum

Skinningrove Mine Water Treatment

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A series of concrete tanks were installed around the year 2000 with high surface area plastic media filtering the mine water, and ochre sludge is collected in the two-metre deep tanks.

Skinningrove Mine Water Treatment

Some of the plastic filters can be seen discarded by the side.

Skinningrove Mine Water Treatment

But the maintenance problems associated with the tanks and media becoming clogged were not initially appreciated and it no longer operates, with the beck still being stained by mine water.

 

Skinningrove Mine Water Treatment