Saturday 18th August – Airy Hill and Cleveland Street

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Skelton History Group

Saturday 18th August – Airy Hill and Cleveland Street
Distance: 3 miles; Ascent 285ft; Duration 2-2½ hours Today’s starting point is outside Skelton Methodist Community Church , Castle Grange, Skelton Green, TS12 2DN at 10:30am. There is a small car park at the rear of the building, otherwise at the roadside. The route takes us along Airy Hill Lane, with fine views across East Cleveland and the Margrove Valley. At the plantation, we leave the lane and take to field paths to drop down, through the woodland, emerging on the Cleveland Street path in the Margrove Valley. This we follow to Boosbeck Road before walking on the footpath back into Skelton Green. The heritage to be seen includes many different industrial sites, a disused railway, and the site of Heartbreak Hill.

A charge of £2 per person will be made on each walk to offset the costs of Insurance. Please wear appropriate footwear and have clothing suitable for the likely weather conditions on that day. It is suggested that you bring food and drink as we usually stop between midday and 1:00pm for a lunch break.

Further details can be had from: skeltonhistorygroup@gmail.com or by contacting Peter Appleton (Tel: 01287 281752)

Demolition of Hollybush Hotel, Skelton

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The snow looks a little out of place as this photo was taken back in late February 2018.
Hollybush Skelton Demolition
This was the final days of the Hollybush before the site was cleared to make way for a care home.

Some stained glass windows with the pub name on were purchased by a friend and some historic photos from the walls retrieved by a member of the Skelton History Group.

Saturday 30th June – Medieval Skelton

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Skelton History Group
Saturday 30th June – Medieval Skelton

Distance: 2 miles; Ascent 255ft; Duration 3-3½ hours For this walk we meet at10:30am outside Skelton Methodist Community Church, Castle Grange, Skelton Green, TS12 2DN. It has been scheduled to coincide with the archaeological investigation into the medieval borough of Skelton, and we will pass the site of the dig. We will also visit Old All Saints church before returning (mostly uphill, I’m afraid!) to our start point using some ancient tracks and pathways.

The pace of the walks is leisurely, with regular stops to admire the view (especially when going uphill!) and to hear about the heritage around us.

A charge of £2 per person will be made on each walk to offset the costs of Insurance. Please wear appropriate footwear and have clothing suitable for the likely weather conditions on that day. It is suggested that you bring food and drink as we usually stop between midday and 1:00pm for a lunch break.

Further details can be had from: skeltonhistorygroup@gmail.com or by contacting Peter Appleton (Tel: 01287 281752)

Skelton Community Mosaic

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This mosaic was installed in September 2017 as part of the Skelton Townscape Heritage Project 

It was researched, designed and produced by the combined efforts of Skelton Villages Civic Pride, Redcar & Cleveland Council’s Community Development staff, the Skelton History Group, pupils at Skelton Primary School and Community artists Helen Jane Gaunt and Derek Mosey.

Skelton Through The Ages 1086 – 2017

      • 1086: The Domesday Book records the manor of Skelton
      • Arms of de Brus: Robert de Brus built the first castle in 12th Century
      • Skelton Castle: building the present castle began in 1788
      • Medieval agriculture: farming was an important part of village life for centuries
      • The old Parish Church: built 1785/86 on the foundations of the 13th Century church
      • A miner and his lamp: the ironstone mining boom in Skelton began in the 1860s

    Skelton Mosaic

    • The High Street and a new Parish Church followed in the 1870s and 1880s
    • A Cleveland Bay horse, England’s oldest breed, pulling a milk cart
    • A Swift flying overhead: their screams are a typical sound of summer
    • The War Memorial: commemorating the dead of two World Wars
    • The Cleveland Way: opened in May 1969
    • The Whipping Post: public punishment on the village green

    Skelton Mosaic

    • Ringrose Community Orchard: a new development, the heritage of the future
    • Children dance round the Maypole in front of the old Infants’ School
    • A sword dancer performing the Long Sword dance
    • 2017 – Planted tubs and a new tree reflect the latest changes

    Skelton Mosaic

Wednesday 21st March – Coal, Quakers, Railways & Ironstone

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Skelton History Group
Wednesday 21st March – Coal, Quakers, Railways & Ironstone

Distance: 3½ miles; Ascent 450ft; Duration: 3½-4 hours Meet at 10:30am outside Skelton Library, on Coniston Road, Skelton. The season opens with a circular walk that takes in Skelton, North Skelton and Hollybush. The heritage comes thick and fast: Frank Wild, Antarctic explorer; the lands of Robert de Brus; medieval trackways; Skelton’s coal mines; the Quaker burial ground; the last ironstone mine to close, at North Skelton; the railway station at North Skelton, and the Longacre ironstone mine.

The pace of the walks is leisurely, with regular stops to admire the view (especially when going uphill!) and to hear about the heritage around us.

A charge of £2 per person will be made on each walk to offset the costs of Insurance. Please wear appropriate footwear and have clothing suitable for the likely weather conditions on that day. It is suggested that you bring food and drink as we usually stop between midday and 1:00pm for a lunch break.

Further details can be had from: skeltonhistorygroup@gmail.com or by contacting Peter Appleton (Tel: 01287 281752)

North Skelton Miners Payslip

Theres lots of information held within this payslip that Gavin Brett shared, theres quite a bit thats difficult to read so I will add to this over time.

Dorman Long and Co. North Skelton Mines, 9th November 1935.
The payslip is for two people, G Thornton and  (J Barnet ?) suggesting they were working as a team, probably one breaking the rock and one filling the tubs.
Their token number is 163, this would allow the weighman to record the stone extracted by them at surface.
received_955300857933597

They only worked 1.5 days and extracted over 29 tons of ironstone and a small amount of sulphur (this sits in a thin band at the top of the ironstone)

Theres a small amount paid for a consideration I can’t read.

The district percentage might apply if a certain area was more difficult to work than other parts of the mine.

8% piecework award, not sure yet.

Yards I suspect would be for driving passages through unproductive ground.
received_955300887933594
They are paying for their own blasting powder, its not provided.

The checkweightmans fund it most likely to pay for an impartial individual to confirm that the mine owners internal weighman is not underpaying the miners.

Northumberland and Durham Miners Permanent Relief Fund Friendly Society – Established in 1862, following the Hartley Pit Disaster, for provision of relief to miners and their families in case of fatal accidents or permanent disablement. The fund was wound up in 1995.

received_955300851266931

The amount earned is equivalent to about £90 today, so not much for 1.5 days work by two people

Frank Wild Statue, Antarctic Explorer, Skelton

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Commander John Robert Francis “Frank” Wild CBE RNVR FRGS was born in Skelton in 1873.

Quoting Wikipedia :-

Frank Wild took part in the following Antarctic expeditions:

In 1901 he was a member of Robert Falcon Scott’s crew as an Able seaman on the Discovery, along with Ernest Shackleton who was then a sub-lieutenant.
He was with Shackleton on the Nimrod Expedition 1908–1909 and was a member of the team that crossed the Ross Barrier and Beardmore Glacier at a record latitude of 88º23’S.
In 1911 he joined Douglas Mawson’s Aurora expedition and was in charge of the western base on the Shackleton Ice Shelf.
He served as Shackleton’s second-in-command on Shackleton’s Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914–1916).
He was second-in-command of the Shackleton–Rowett Expedition (1921–22).

Frank Wild was also awarded the ‘Polar Medal with Four Clasps’

On 29 September 2016 this statue by sculptor William Harling was unveiled in the Ringrose Orchard by Mr Anthony Wharton.

Frank Wild Statue, Skelton

Frank Wild, Antarctic explorer.

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John Robert Francis Wild was born on the 10th of April 1873 in Skelton.

Wikipedia informs us :-

In 1901 he was a member of Robert Falcon Scott’s crew as an Able seaman on the Discovery, along with Ernest Shackleton who was then a sub-lieutenant.
He was with Shackleton on the Nimrod Expedition 1908–1909 and was a member of the team that crossed the Ross Barrier and Beardmore Glacier at a record latitude of 88º23’S.
In 1911 he joined Douglas Mawson’s Aurora expedition and was in charge of the western base on the Shackleton Ice Shelf.
He served as Shackleton’s second-in-command on Shackleton’s Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914–1916).
He was second-in-command of the Shackleton–Rowett Expedition (1921–22).

A more extensive biography and photos can be found here

Frank Wild

I was always doomed to failure, trying to get a decent photo of something behind glass in a well lit building.

Skelton Mill

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A corn mill has been recorded in Skelton since as early as 1272 although these buildings probably date from the 19th century. Only the building without the roof was actually the mill
Skelton Mill
Skelton Mill
The mill was still being used to generate electricity rather than mill corn when it was hit by a Germany bomb on 15th or 16th April 1942 (sources vary)

The remains were reduced in 1965 to allow for the widening of the road as it now goes right through the location of the mill.

The two historical images above come from Bill Danbys excellent Skelton History pages.