Skelton Primitive Methodist Chapel 1865

Primitive Methodists split from the Wesleyan Methodists in 1807 and continued until the Methodist Union in 1932. They became known as the “‘Ranters” due to their evangelical preaching.

Skelton Primitive Methodists 1865
Skelton Primitive Methodists 1865
Hitherto Hath The Lord Helped Us

They had a strong following among the poor and working class, which perhaps explains the involvement of local ironstone mine owners Pease and Bell Brothers.

There’s an account of the opening of Skelton Primitive Methodist chapel by H Pratt in the Primitive Methodist magazine of April 1866

The cost was around £259, Donors included Jos. Pease, Mr Bell, Earl of Zetland, J Wharton, J Pease MP, G Pease, Captain Challoner, FA Millbank MP and Jos Fawcett.

Guisborough Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel was built on Chapel Street in 1860 at a cost of £425, the plaque now worn flat and painted blue presumably once carried the name and date.

Guisborough Cons Club - Ex Methodist Chapel
Guisborough Cons Club 2019

In 1907 they relocated to much larger premises on Westgate at a cost of £4000, which is still a Methodist church. The site is now the Guisborough Cons Club .

Loftus Primitive Methodists






Skinningrove Methodist Chapel

The Methodist chapel in Skinningrove dates from 1873 and is still active today.

Skinningrove Chapel
Skinningrove Chapel

Northern Echo – Wednesday 30 July 1873

PRIMITIVE, METHODIST CHAPEL AT SKINNINGROVE. FOUNDATION STONE LAYING. The ceremony of laying the foundation of a new Primitive Methodist Chapel at Skinningrove took place on Monday. For many years the Primitive Methodists conducted services alone in Skinningrove. When there were little more than a dozen houses they held cottage meetings, and it has had a place on the circuit plan for thirty years. When, through the enterprising firm of the Messrs. Pease, the population had increased to near 1,500, it was felt that this long toil should not be thrown away, but that there should be a fresh effort to meet the spiritual requirements of the population, and a site was generously granted by the late Earl of Zetland, The day being fine, there was a large gathering, and a procession, composed chiefly of working men, sang through the streets. The Rev. W. BAITEY, superintendent, began the service by giving out a hymn. The Rev.J. Wilson, Congregational minister, offered prayer. The Rev. J. G. Binney, from the Theological Institute, recently appointed as second minister, read suitable portions of scripture. The Rev. W. BAITEY, addressing Mr. W. Cockburn, who had kindly consented to lay the stone, remarked that it gave them all pleasure to see Mr. Cockburn in their midst, with his excellent lady, and likewise Mr. Francis. Mr. Cockburn had been permitted, through the providence of God, to aid in laying the foundation of a thriving industry in many village, and memorials of his devising mind would be found when he was gone. Today, he came to aid in laying the foundation of another house of prayer. Mr. Baitey then handed to Mr. Cockburn a bottle to enclose in the stone, and a silver trowel and mallet. The bottle contained a copy of the Primitive Methodist paper the Northern Echo of that day; the .British Workman, having a, portrait of Gurney Pease, Esq.; lines written by Mr. Horsley on the death of Charles Pease, Esq., a Circuit Plan, the names of the Trustees, and Members in Society, letters of Mir. Cockburn and Mr. Francis expressing their readiness to assist in the undertaking, and which, if ever exhumed, which they might be after cenrturies have gone by, all show how worthily the early managers of the firm represented the well. known spirit and principles of the masters. There was also a short record of those who took part in the services, and gratitude expressed to Mr. D. Trotter and Mr. D. Maclean, agents of the Earl of Zetland, for their kind assistance.

Mr Cockburn next deposited upon the stone a cheque for 10 shillings. Mr. J. Tyerman, a working man, and one whose devoutness is known in all the villages round about, laid on the stone the handsome donation of 5 shillings. Numerous other donations were laid on the stone, from two pounds to the child’s sixpence, making a total of over 38 shillings. Nearly 300 sat down to tea in the old School-room. The evening meeting was presided over by Mr. W. Cockburn, who spoke of our intellectual, social, moral, and spiritual duties. Other gentlemen and ministers also addressed the meeting. The total proceeds of the day amounted to about 60 shillings. The building is a Gothic structure. The architect is T. Southron, of South Shields.

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church Mission School, Thornaby

St Andrews Mission at Thornaby is still a functioning church, their website states that St.Andrews was a mission station started by the much larger Presbyterian Church in Stockton, originally as a Sunday School. When the Presbyterian Church and the Congregational Church joined together, it became part of the United Reformed Church

St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church Mission School, Thornaby

The date stone above the building carries the date 1893, it cost about £950 and could seat 200.

St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church Mission School, Thornaby

One foundation stone was laid by Mrs Bouge of the Manse on October 1st 1892, presumably the wife of Rev. J Bogue

St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church Mission School, Thornaby

The second stone is heavily eroded and difficult to interpret, but my research shows it to be Mrs G Y Blair who laid the stone. That would be the wife of George Young Blair who managed the Fossick & Hackworth Locomotive Engine Works which he came to own after 1866 as Blair and Co. who manufactured marine engines.

St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church Mission School, Thornaby

The Northern Echo from Monday 03 October 1892 report on the events in full.

Stafford Place Methodist Chapel, Sun Street, Thornaby

The Stafford Place Methodist Chapel appears to have operated between 1911 and 1965 and had a seating capacity of 300. It cost £800 to build and replaced an 1833 building.

Stafford Place Methodist Chapel, Sun Street, Thornaby

This foundation stone was laid by Charles Arthur Head Esq, Mayor, May 25th 1911. One of the directors of Head, Wrightson, and Co.

Stafford Place Methodist Chapel, Sun Street, Thornaby

The second foundation stone has been badly eroded with only the 1911 at the end visible.

Stafford Place Methodist Chapel, Sun Street, Thornaby

The stone was laid by the Walker family of Scarborough who made a sizeable contribution. Their link is Ambrose Walker who puchase the nearby pottery in
September 1878.

Stump Cross, Danby

Stump Cross stands a few hundred meters to the east of Danby Beacon at the junction of two medieval trackways.
Stump Cross, Danby
Stonegate which runs from the village called Stonegate to Danby Beacon and Leavergate which runs from the Danby Beacon towards Easington.
Stump Cross, Danby
It is thought the original cross shaft was longer and only the broken ‘stump’ remains, although given its current name of ‘Stump Cross’ that break must have happened in the distant past.