Wreck of the Admiral Van Tromp – Saltwick Bay

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The Admiral Van Tromp was a Scarborough trawler that ran aground on 30/09/1976.
The exact circumstance of the accident remain a mystery as the boat was on completely the wrong course and a senior nautical surveyor at the inquest stated it appeared it was driven onto the rocks deliberately.

No-one will ever know the real reasons as the man at the wheel John ‘Scotch Jack’ Addison was killed, along with one other crew member.

The details of the accident are covered in much greater detail on the website of the Scarborough Maritime Heritage Centre
Admiral Von Tromp Wreck - Saltwick Bay Admiral Von Tromp Wreck - Saltwick Bay
Admiral Von Tromp Wreck - Saltwick Bay
Again, check the tide tables before visiting wreck sites and needing a rescue yourself.

Wreck of the Rohilla – Saltwick Bay

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The Rohilla was launched by Harland and Wolff in Belfast on the 6th September 1906. On 6th August 1914 she became a hospital ship.
At 4am on 29th October 1914 the Rohilla struck rocks at Saltwick Nab near Whitby with 229 people on board. A huge rescue attempt was mounted that lasted several days due to the terrible weather conditions, however over 80 people perished. A huge amount of details on the disaster can be found on this website

A few fragments of the ship can be found to the west of Saltwick Nab, although care should be taken to check tide tables before visiting. Much more of the wreck remain still under the water.
Rohilla Wreck - Saltwick Nab Rohilla Wreck - Saltwick Nab

Wreck of the Creteblock – Whitby

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The MV Creteblock was constructed in Shoreham around 1919/20 from reinforced concrete rather than steel which was in short supply during World War 1 (although it was completed too late to see active service)
Wreck of the Creteblock - Whitby
Wreck of the Creteblock - Whitby
Smiths Dock used the vessel as a tug until 1934/1935 when she was brought to Whitby to be scrapped, the ship deteriorated there until 1947 when she was finally to be scuttled in deep water, however the boat sank in shallow water just outside the harbour and was later blown up
Wreck of the Creteblock - Whitby
Wreck of the Creteblock - Whitby

Care should be taken to check the tides before visiting this location

William Scoresby Jr and Snr, Crows Nest Sculpture, Whitby

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Scoresby and son were arctic explorer who mapped much of the east coast of Greenland and took the Resolution to within 510 miles of the North Pole in 1806. Scoresby Snr invented the barrel crows nest, a reproduction of which is in the Whitby Museum. Scoresby Jr is known for his work developing ships compasses. They are depicted in a crows nest by Kevin Storch.

William Scoresby Crows Nest Sculpture, Whitby William Scoresby Crows Nest Sculpture, Whitby

Moored nearby is the Grand Turk a modern replica of the frigate HMS Blandford built in 1741, it has appeared on TV in the Hornblower series

Grand Turk, Whitby

Boiling Well or Abba (Abbey) Well, Whitby

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Boiling Well, Whitby Boiling Well, Whitby

Boiling Well, Whitby

Currently the plaque says :-

“In the early nineteenth century Mr Joseph Brown piped water from this spring to a reservoir in the grounds of Whitby Abbey, to provide a clean and reliable water supply to the east side of Whitby”

Apparently a few years ago there was a different plaque. which read.

T’awd Abba Well
Also known as the old Boiling Well

Lang centuries aback
This wor’t awd Abba Well
Saint Hilda veiled i’ black
Lang centuries aback
Supped frey it an no lack
All t sisterhood as well
Lang centuries aback
This wor’t awd Abba Well

Not the best photos in the world, as I only had a mobile phone with me.

Update January 2009

Sheila Welch has kindly provided some slides of the well taken in the 1970s by her father George Towndrow, these show the original plaque still in place.

Abba Well, Whitby 70s

Abba Well, Whitby 70s

Robin Hood’s Close and Little John’s Close, Whitby

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A new year contribution from my Whitby correspondent Peter Craggs (mention my name and you may get an extra sausage if staying at his B&B)

Legend has it that an archery contest took place between Robin Hood and Little John. Arrows were shot from Whitby Abbey into the area known as Whitby Laithes (about 2km so believe that if you will)

Two stones mark the positions of the arrows, although they are 1903 replacements rather than the originals, the fields on either side are still named as Robin Hood’s and Little John’s.
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Much more detail on the story is given here, with some claiming links back to Robin Goodfellow and Bronze Age standing stones.